Posts for: June, 2015

By Michael C Scheske, DDS, PC
June 24, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: crowns  
CrownscannowbemadeIn-OfficewiththeCADCAMSystem

The traditional way to restore a tooth with an artificial crown takes several weeks and multiple office visits: from tooth preparation and impression molding to crown production by a dental laboratory, followed by adjustments and cementing. Now, there’s an alternative that reduces this process to a fraction of the time, and all from your dentist’s office.

Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM) is a digital system that enables dentists to create dental restorations with laboratory-grade materials in minutes rather than weeks. As it continues to innovate, you’ll see more and more dentists investing in the new technology for their patients.

A crown restoration with CAD/CAM begins like any other with decay removal and preparation of the tooth. It diverges, though, from the traditional in how an impression of your teeth and gums is obtained: instead of rubber-like molding materials to create a physical impression, we lightly dust the mouth interior with a reflective powder. Using a scanning wand, the reflective powder allows us to capture multiple, detailed images of your mouth that the CAD/CAM computer transforms into an accurate three-dimensional model.

We use the model to first assess if the tooth has been effectively prepared for a restoration. If so, the design feature of the system will provide us with thousands of tooth forms to choose from to match with your natural teeth. You’ll be able to view the proposed size and shape of the new crown via computer simulation before signing off on the design.

Next is the actual manufacture of the crown that takes place right in the dentist’s office. A pre-formed block of ceramic material is inserted in the milling equipment where, following the pre-determined computer design, the milling heads carve the ceramic block. After milling, we fine-tune the crown surface and apply stains or glazes fired to create a life-like color and texture that matches your natural teeth. We can then adjust the crown in your mouth and permanently affix it to the tooth.

While much of the CAD/CAM system is automated, ultimate success still depends on the dentist’s expertise and artistry. CAD/CAM enhances those skills with greater precision and in much less time than traditional crowns. It’s certainly a growing option for many people to restore the form and function of decayed teeth.

If you would like more information on computer-aided dental restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Creating In-Office Dental Restorations with Computers.”


By Michael C Scheske, DDS, PC
June 09, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: gum disease  
AdvancingGumDiseaseRequiresYourDentistsIntervention

Your gums’ primary role is to protect your teeth and keep them firmly in place. But periodontal (gum) disease can damage your gums to such an extent you could ultimately lose your teeth.

Gum disease is a progressive infection caused by bacterial plaque built up on tooth surfaces from poor oral hygiene. The initial infection triggers inflammation, a defensive response of the body characterized by swelling, redness and bleeding of the gums. An initial form of the disease known as gingivitis occurs in most people after just a few days without brushing or flossing.

Resuming hygienic activities to remove daily plaque, along with regular dental cleanings, may be enough to stop gingivitis and restore healthy gums. If the disease is allowed to advance, however, the infected gum tissues will begin to detach from the teeth, turning the slight normal gaps between teeth and gums into wider voids known as periodontal pockets that fill with bacteria leading to infection. Your hygiene efforts will not be enough to cope with this advanced form of periodontal disease.

At this point professional techniques are required to adequately remove plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits), depending on the depth and location of the periodontal pockets. The most basic of these is scaling using specialized hand instruments or ultrasonic equipment to remove plaque and calculus in pockets at or just below the gum line. If plaque and calculus have extended to the roots we may then need to employ root planing, in which we “shave” offending material from root surfaces. In some cases this may require accessing the area surgically beneath the gum tissue.

As plaque removal progresses, inflammation will begin to subside and the gum tissues heal. If, however, swelling, bleeding or pus formation persists, this may indicate bacterial levels remain too high. To decrease these levels we may need to administer antibiotics, or through mouthrinses containing chlorhexidine.

Once under control, it’s crucial from then on for you to maintain a strict daily regimen of brushing and flossing to keep plaque from building up on tooth surfaces. You'll also need to visit us regularly (two or more times a year) for professional cleaning and checkups. Keeping a close eye will help prevent a reoccurrence of this serious disease and prolong the life of your teeth.

If you would like more information on treating periodontal (gum) disease, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treating Difficult Areas of Periodontal Disease.”


By Michael C Scheske, DDS, PC
June 02, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: ibuprofen   pain management  
NSAIDsforPainManagementisSafe-ifUsedProperly

Millions of Americans regularly use ibuprofen to manage minor pain and swelling. As with other fields in healthcare, the drug is a mainstay in dentistry especially for post-procedural discomfort. But ibuprofen and similar drugs also have side effects that can lead to serious health problems. So, should you be concerned about its safety?

For most people, ibuprofen is safe and effective — but only if used properly. Like aspirin, ibuprofen is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) that reduces pain and inflammation by blocking the effect of substances called prostaglandins, released by injured or damaged tissues. NSAIDs differ in mechanism from pain relievers like steroids or narcotics and don’t have the same side effects, especially the addictive qualities and impaired consciousness potential of narcotics like morphine or codeine. While these more potent drugs are usually reserved for serious injuries or illnesses, NSAIDs like ibuprofen are ideal for mild to moderate pain following routine dental work.

The biggest concern for the use of an NSAID is its tendency to thin the blood, especially if used continuously over several weeks; this can make bleeding control more difficult after an injury. Prolonged overuse has also been linked to erosion of the stomach lining leading to ulcers or bleeding, kidney failure, early miscarriage and repeat heart attacks for patients with cardiovascular disease.

With this in mind, we recommend that adults take no more than 2,400 milligrams of ibuprofen during one twenty-four hour period for short-term pain relief unless otherwise recommended by a doctor. Research has shown that a single 400-milligram dose of ibuprofen is safe and effective for relieving even severe post-operative pain for about five hours in most people. On the other hand, we don’t recommend a NSAID during pregnancy or for people with a history of intestinal bleeding or heart attacks.

Taking into account your medical history and the procedure you’ll be undergoing, we will recommend the best pain management medication for your situation. In most cases, ibuprofen will be an effective means to reduce your discomfort level and, taken properly, will not pose a danger to your overall health.

If you would like more information on dental pain management, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Treating Pain with Ibuprofen.”












Union, MO
Family Dentist
301 US Hwy 50 W
Suite C

Union, MO 63084
(636) 583-8100

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