Posts for tag: oral health

By Michael C Scheske, DDS, PC
February 27, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   pregnancy  
DontAvoidDentalCareWhileYourePregnant

Learning you're pregnant can change your life in a heartbeat—or now two. Suddenly, what was important to you just seconds before the news takes a back seat to the reality of a new life growing within you.

But although many of your priorities will change, there's one in particular that shouldn't—taking care of your dental health. In fact, because of the hormonal changes that will begin to occur in your body, your risk of dental disease may increase during pregnancy.

Because of these hormonal variations, you may find you have increased cravings for certain foods. If that includes eating more carbohydrates (especially sugar), bacteria can begin to multiply in your mouth and make you more susceptible to tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease.

The hormones in themselves can also increase your risk of gum disease in particular. There's even a name for a very common form of gum infection—pregnancy gingivitis—which affects around two-fifths of pregnant women. If not treated, it could aggressively spread deeper within the gums and endanger both your teeth and supporting jaw bone.

The key to minimizing both tooth decay and gum disease is to keep your mouth clean of dental plaque, a thin bacterial biofilm most responsible for these diseases. You can do this by keeping up daily brushing and flossing and maintaining regular dental cleanings and checkups. Professional dental care is especially important during pregnancy.

You may, though, have some reservations about some aspects of dental care, especially if they involve undergoing local anesthesia. But many medical organizations including the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the American Dental Association recommend dental treatment during pregnancy. Even procedures involving local anesthesia won't increase the risk of harm to you or your baby.

That said, though, elective dental work such as cosmetic enhancements, might be better postponed until after the baby is born. It's best to discuss with your dentist which treatments are essential and should be performed without delay, and which are not. In general, though, there's nothing to fear for you or your baby continuing your regular dental care—in fact, it's more important than ever.

If you would like more information on dental care during pregnancy, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Dental Care During Pregnancy.”

By Michael C Scheske, DDS, PC
January 18, 2021
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   oral hygiene  
HerestoHealthySmilesin2021

A New Year's resolution can be just about anything, from losing weight to visiting every major league baseball park. But a resolution you're more likely to keep ought to have two things going for it: It's doable and it changes your life for the better. Here's one that meets those criteria—taking better care of your smile. So we hope that made your 2021 list.

Resolving to pursue more committed dental care can have a double benefit. It can improve your dental health and it could help you gain a more attractive smile. What's more, it's not hard to do—it takes only about five minutes of your time each day, along with a couple of dental visits a year.

Here's how you can make better smile care in 2021 one of your best New Year's resolutions ever.

Brush and floss daily. Your mouth's biggest enemy is dental plaque, a thin film of bacteria and food particles on tooth surfaces. The bacteria in plaque can cause both tooth decay and gum disease. But by removing accumulated plaque with brushing and flossing, you can drastically reduce your risk for dental disease. The key is to do it every day without fail—no holidays!

Have your teeth cleaned. Even if you're an oral hygiene ninja, you can still miss some plaque, which may then harden into calculus (or tartar). This calcified form (which is just as harmful as softer plaque) is nearly impossible to remove by brushing or flossing. But we can at the dental office—which is why having your teeth professionally cleaned every six months makes it even less likely you'll encounter dental disease.

Give your teeth a better diet. If you're also resolving to eat more nutritiously, here's an extra incentive: Your diet can impact your dental health. On one hand, diets high in certain carbohydrates (particularly sugar) increase your risk for disease. On the other hand, a balanced diet of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, and dairy products can strengthen your teeth and help them stay healthy.

Update your dental work. You may have fillings, crowns or bridges that fixed a dental problem in the past but may have since fallen into disrepair. If so, now is the time to update them—and putting it off could increase your risk for disease or other serious dental problems. Taking care of needed renovations to older dental work promotes better oral health, and may also improve your smile.

Want to start the New Year off right in regard to your teeth and gums? See us for a complete checkup and evaluation of your dental health. Together, we can develop just the right care plan to help you achieve your resolution of a healthier mouth and a more attractive smile.

If you would like more information about effective dental care, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Daily Oral Hygiene.”

By Michael C Scheske, DDS, PC
December 19, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
BoostYourDentalHealthWithSoon-To-ExpireFSAFunds

If you're among the estimated 14 million families with a healthcare flexible spending account (FSA), New Year's Eve has an added meaning—that's typically the deadline for using any current year funds. Since any remaining money in your FSA could go poof at the stroke of midnight on December 31st, you might be looking for a way to spend it. If so, consider a dental health boost for you and your family.

FSAs were created in the 1970s by the U.S. Government as a salary benefit that employers could offer employees. Instead of receiving all of their pay as taxable income, employees could designate a portion of it (currently up to $2,650) in a non-taxable account to use for certain medical and dental expenses. An FSA thus provides families a way to pay for uncovered healthcare costs while saving on their taxes.

But because most FSAs expire by the end of the year and then restart with a fresh balance in the new year, there's a natural concern that you will “use or lose” remaining money. People thus begin looking for eligible expenses like treatments, prescribed medications or eyeglasses. They can't, however, use them for items like over-the-counter medical products (though some pain relievers get a pass this year because of COVID-19), as well as most things cosmetic.

The same generally holds true for dental expenses—you won't be able to use FSA funds for procedures like teeth whitening or veneers. Toothbrushes and other routine oral care products are also ineligible, although you may be able to buy items like a water flosser if your dentist issues you a Letter of Medical Necessity (LMN).

Still, there's a wide range of eligible dental items you could pay for with remaining FSA funds.

Prevention measures. Any procedures or treatments intended to prevent disease are typically FSA-eligible. These can include measures like regular dental cleanings, sealants or fluoride applications.

Disease treatment. FSAs cover procedures like fillings, extractions, gum surgery or root canals. This could include repairing damage from disease through dental bonding or crowns, which might also improve your smile.

Dental restorations. Missing teeth restorations like bridgework, dentures or dental implants are also covered. These may improve your appearance, but they primarily restore disrupted dental function.

Out-of-pocket expenses. Although you can't pay for dental insurance premiums, an FSA may be able to help in other ways. You can use FSA funds for co-pays or any remaining out-of-pocket expenses.

If you're not sure what dental expenses might be eligible for FSA funds, give our office a call and we can provide you guidance. If FSA funds can help, you'll be able to improve your dental health—and possibly your appearance—before you ring in 2021.

If you would like more information about managing your dental care, please contact us or schedule a consultation.

By Michael C Scheske, DDS, PC
August 11, 2020
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: oral health   pregnancy  
EliminatinganInfantsLiporTongueTieCanMakeBreastfeedingEasier

Most babies come into the world ready and able to nourish at their mother's breast—no training required! About one in ten children, though, may have a structural abnormality with their tongue or lip that makes it difficult for them to breastfeed.

The abnormality involves a small strip of tissue called a frenum or frenulum, which is found in the mouth connecting soft tissue to more rigid structures. You'll find a frenum attaching the upper lip to the gums, while another connects the underside of the tongue to the floor of the mouth.

Frenums are a normal part of oral anatomy and usually don't pose a problem. But if the frenum tissue is too short, thick or tight, it could restrict lip or tongue movement. If so, a baby may not be able to achieve a good seal on their mother's nipple, causing them to ineffectively chew rather than suck to access the mother's milk. Such a situation guarantees an unpleasant experience for both mother and baby.

The problem can be addressed with a minor surgical procedure performed in a dentist's office. During the procedure, the dentist first numbs the area with an anesthetic gel. The frenum is then snipped with scissors or a laser.

With very little if any post-procedure care, the baby can immediately begin nursing. But although the physical impediment may be removed, the child may need to “relearn” how to nurse. It may take time for the baby to readjust, and could require help from a professional.

Nursing isn't the only reason for dealing with an abnormally shortened frenum. Abnormal frenums can interfere with speech development and may even widen gaps between the front teeth, contributing to poor bite development. It's often worthwhile to clip a frenum early before it creates other problems.

It isn't absolutely necessary to deal with a “tongue” or “lip tie” in this manner—a baby can be nourished by bottle. But to gain the physical and emotional benefits of breastfeeding, taking care of this particular problem early may be a good option.

If you would like more information on the problem of tongue or lip ties in infants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Tongue Ties, Lip Ties and Breastfeeding.”

By Michael C Scheske, DDS, PC
July 12, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
AShinglesOutbreakCouldInterruptYourDentalCare

A shingles outbreak can be painful and embarrassing. It could also interfere with many areas of your life—including your dental care.

Known medically as herpes zoster, shingles is a viral form of chicken pox. The virus can lie dormant for many years or decades in people that had chicken pox as a child, breaking out later in life (sometimes repeatedly). It's estimated about a quarter of people who had chicken pox as a child, about 90% of adults, will experience a shingles outbreak.

In the beginning, a person with shingles may notice an itching or burning skin irritation, as well as numbness or sensitivity to touch. In time, a red, crusty rash can develop, usually forming a belted or striped pattern on the torso, head or facial areas. The patterning is caused by the virus's disruption of nerves that serve those parts of the body.

Shingles could impact your dental care because it can be contagious early in an outbreak. As such, it can be transmitted to other people via contact with the rash or through airborne respiratory particles. Dental staff members or other patients who are pregnant, undergoing cancer treatment or with other conditions that compromise their immune systems can develop serious health problems if they contract the virus.

If you have an upcoming appointment, it's best then to let your dentist know you've been diagnosed with shingles. If your treatment involves physical contact that could spread the virus, they may wish to reschedule you until the outbreak clears up.

There are ways to hasten the healing process with antiviral treatments like acyclovir or famciclovir. For best results, these treatments should begin within 3 days of a shingles outbreak. There is also a shingles vaccine that can help you avoid an outbreak altogether. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) recommend it for adults over 60.

Having shingles can be painful and stressful, and pose a major interruption of your daily life and routine. With proper management, though, it can be contained so you can get on with your life—and your dental care.

If you would like more information on managing shingles and dental care, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Shingles, Herpes Zoster.”












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Union, MO 63084
(636) 583-8100

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